Elee Kirk

Children, Nature, Museums

research methods Archive

Saturday

16

May 2015

0

COMMENTS

Talking about museum learning

Written by , Posted in Children, Interview, Research

This is a super-quick post, just to say that you can hear me talking about my research on the Boundary Objects podcast, with Dr Amy Jane Barnes and Dr Ceri Jones. Amy and Ceri are good friends of mine, who also studied and now work at the wonderful School of Museum Studies at the University of Leicester. In this podcast, we discuss my PhD research with young children in a natural history museum, and Ceri’s PhD research about teenagers and Medieval living history. We also think more broadly about the challenges of carrying out research with schools in museums. And we get a bit carried away reminiscing about the 90’s TV show Maid Marian and her Merry Men.

You can find the podcast, and a few useful links, here. It’s fairly long (nearly 40 mins), so I reckon this is a good one to listen to on a long commute, or whilst you’re doing the ironing.

Boundary Objects is a group for early career researchers working with museums and collections. Get in touch with them through their website if you’re interested in joining.

Friday

6

July 2012

3

COMMENTS

Biophobophilia, or, why children (sort of) love big, pointy teeth

Written by , Posted in Research

During the course of my research at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, I’ve noticed an interesting phenomenon. This may not come as a surprise to those of you with children, or who actually remember being a child, but it seems that children really love animals with scary teeth. In this particular museum, the favourites seem to be a large stuffed crocodile, and a model T. rex head.

My PhD research involves getting 4- and 5-year-old children to photograph things they like in the museum, and then talk to me about the pictures. Two thirds of the children photographed this head. And when it was mentioned in interviews, children often told me that they liked it (it was sometimes a favourite), that they liked it’s sharp teeth, and that they had put their hands in its mouth or touched its teeth. (more…)

Sunday

1

July 2012

1

COMMENTS

Observation Notes: Not All Bones are Dinosaurs

Written by , Posted in Research, Visitors

Elephant skeletons

Over the past couple of years I’ve spent a lot of time at the wonderful Oxford University Museum of Natural History, where I’m carrying out my PhD research. Although the bulk of my research has involved getting four- and five-year-olds to take photographs for me (as I described in my very first post), I have spent almost as much time wandering around and around the museum, observing visitors more generally.

I really love doing observations. I think it’s easy to imagine that most museum visits are quite mundane – we see the other visitors milling around, or we mill around ourselves, and everything blends into the hubbub of the crowds. But when you start paying attention to the individual conversations, you see that actually the museum glitters with gems of quirky conversation and idiosyncratic behaviour that reveal the individuality of each visitor’s experience. (more…)

Tuesday

19

June 2012

0

COMMENTS

Cameras, Children and Museums

Written by , Posted in Research

Hello, and welcome to Through the Museoscope. This is my brand-new blog, in which I plan to talk about the things that interest me about visiting, working in, studying, and generally thinking about museums. For more on the name of the blog, check out the ‘About’ menu.

I thought I’d start of by talking a bit about the research that I’m in the process of carrying out right now. I’m currently about 3/4 of the way through a PhD at the very wonderful School of Museum Studies, University of Leicester, UK. My thesis explores young children’s experiences of natural history in museums. After spending the first year and a half thinking about and trying out different methods, audiences and museums, my project ended up at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History (visit it, it’s great!), getting 4- and 5-year-old children visiting with their families to use digital cameras to photograph the things they liked about the museum. (more…)